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PennDOT Videos on Pedestrian Safety

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image Four-Part Pedestrian Safety Series from PennDOT

The videos are for parents of elementary school students, elementary-school students, middle-school students and young or first-time drivers.

HARRISBURG, Pa., July 11, 2013 -- PennDOT Secretary Barry J. Schoch today announced that the department has produced four new videos aimed at educating children, motorists and parents about pedestrian safety.

"Whether you're in a vehicle or a pedestrian walking across the street, we all have equal responsibilities to think of safety first on our roadways," Schoch said. "These videos are a great way to educate our youth on lifelong safe walking habits, and they're a resource for parents to help keep their kids safe."

Each video targets different audiences at various stages of learning pedestrian safety or driving near pedestrians. The videos are intended primarily for parents of elementary school students, elementary-school students, middle-school students and young or first-time drivers.

"One Parent to Another: Pedestrian Safety" shows how safety starts with parents and guardians, and that children model their behavior. It shows how and when to cross legally while walking, and how to avoid putting children in dangerous situations when they're pedestrians.

"Walk This Way: Pedestrian Safety for Young People" shows elementary-school aged children what a walker is and how to safely walk. It also stresses the importance of walking with a parent/guardian/older sibling, and shows dangerous crossing situations and how to address them.

"Kids Explain: Pedestrian Safety for Middle School-Aged Kids" aims to increase pedestrian safety for middle school children walking to and from school by teaching them the basics of safe walking.

"Close Call: Pedestrian Safety for Young Drivers" teaches young drivers how and why to safely operate a motor vehicle in relation to pedestrians.

The videos for elementary- and middle-school students explain walking signals and scenarios, stress safe walking behaviors and reinforce who should accompany them. The video for parents demonstrates walking safety and emphasizes the importance of modeling safe behaviors for their children. Younger drivers are shown that with their driving freedom comes the responsibility of watching for travelers of all types, especially in school zones.

PennDOT data shows that in the past five years, there were 4,558 pedestrian injuries and 743 pedestrians lost their lives in Pennsylvania traffic crashes. In that same time period, there were 22,144 reported crashes involving pedestrians.

Of the pedestrians killed in crashes in the past five years, 86 were 18 years old or younger. Though those under 18 years old make up roughly 26 percent of the state's population, they accounted for 7,000, or 33 percent, of the total pedestrian injuries.

For more information on pedestrian safety in Pennsylvania, visit www.JustDrivePA.com.

Media contact: Erin Waters-Trasatt, 717-783-8800

SOURCE Pennsylvania Department of Transportation

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